Published Articles

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Bill Gates was recently quoted as saying that bioterrorism could kill more people than nuclear war, but that Western governments are not ready to deal with it. The situation may be worse than he thinks. What stories about his remarks at the Munich Security Conference did not explain is that the FBI has still failed to resolve the question of who carried out the post-9/11 anthrax attacks on America.

Some of the evidence points to al Qaeda, and there are reports that other Islamic terrorist groups, such as ISIS, are now developing biological weapons.

For his part, President Donald Trump is currently engaged in a feud with the FBI over “illegal leaks” that he wants investigated and stopped.

Trump has a right to be concerned, even alarmed. And he certainly has a right to know the full extent of the corruption that ran rampant in the Bureau during its investigation of the post-9/11 anthrax attacks, known as Amerithrax. The gross mishandling of the case serves as an example of how not to conduct a national security investigation involving weapons of mass destruction. It is also a warning that something similar—or perhaps more catastrophic—could happen again...

Keyword(s): anthrax, bioterrorism, FBI


Wednesday, March 1, 2017

The founding fathers of the Munich Security Conference, said John McCain [photo, below], would “be alarmed by the turning away from universal values and toward old ties of blood, and race, and sectarianism.”

McCain was followed by Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov who called for a “post-West world order.” Russia has “immense potential” for that said Lavrov, “we’re open for that inasmuch as the U.S. is open.”

Now McCain is not wrong. Nationalism is an idea whose time has come again. Those “old ties of blood, and race, and sectarianism” do seem everywhere ascendant. But that is a reality we must recognize and deal with. Deploring it will not make it go away.

But what are these “universal values” McCain is talking about?

Democracy? The free elections in India gave power to Hindu nationalists. In Palestine, Hamas. In Lebanon, Hezbollah. In Egypt, the Muslim Brotherhood, then overthrown in a military coup welcomed by the world’s oldest and greatest democracy. Have we forgotten it was a democratically elected government we helped to overthrow in Kiev?

Democracy is a...



Monday, February 20, 2017

This article is a review of Big Agenda: President Trump’s Plan to Save America (2017) by David Horowitz, an instructive and engaging tome that can be read at one sitting. Horowitz begins with a discussion of the dissension in the Republican ranks with Trump's candidacy for the presidency. And he is correct when he writes that many Republicans were erroneously and unproductively fighting as hard to defeat Trump — particularly some even in the cast of the old George H.W. Bush mindset — as they did to defeat the Democrats in previous elections. These were mostly RINOs or envious rivals; sadly they also included Jeb Bush, Mitt Romney, etc. 

But many Republicans also did not support Trump because they did not believe he was a true conservative and at times his philosophy seemed muddy. Ted Cruz was in this camp; but Cruz seems to have learned that as, Horowitz wrote, Trump has as big or a bigger chance to change America for the better than Ronald Reagan. I remembered that I did not support George H.W. Bush (#41) in the election of 1992 because I considered him a moderate Republican but not a conservative. He derailed the Reagan revolution. I voted for the libertarian...



Sunday, February 12, 2017

The liberal media continue their hostile criticism of everything President Trump says and does. The latest brouhaha has been raised with the fake media outrage against Trump for his critical remarks of U.S. District Judge James Robart, the federal judge in Seattle who halted the enforcement of the executive order banning immigration from seven countries with terrorist ties. The judge’s freeze was implemented allegedly because of the violation of the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Trump had picked these seven predominantly Muslim countries for his travel ban because they had been previously identified by the Obama administration as countries that could endanger the security of the United States. Be that as it may, the Ninth Circuit Court has today ruled against Trump. One wonders what would have happened if Trump had included pariah, atheist, communist North Korea in the ban?

The fact is we may have to wait for the Supreme Court to decide the issue, so I will not discuss constitutionality further. What seems to be lost in all this, though, is that Trump, as President of the United States, has the duty to protect the U.S. from all...



Wednesday, February 8, 2017

It has been said that truth is the first causality of war and we have been at war with the collectivist elements for the past two hundred years. One among many demands by the delusional left is that we should have open borders and that protected borders and using a rational and legal method of choosing who can enter our country and become a citizen is un-American, heartless and evil. With fake tears in his eyes and in a trembling voice Senator Charles Schumer (D-NY) tried to convince the nation that protecting our borders is indeed un-American. The conscripted mind of the leftist followers all repeat this mantra unexamined, as if it is were an obvious reasoned idea.

To want to protect our borders from being invaded by hordes of other nations’ misfits, criminals, violent gangs and drug dealers as well as trained terrorist armies bent on our destruction, is considered mean spirited, heartless, cruel and — well, fascist by the deviant left. Now, to those of us who have actually read history, we know that using the term fascist to categorize one's enemy was engineered by Stalin to describe the members of the regime of his previous partner in world revolution, Hitler. The...

Keyword(s): politics, U.S. government


Thursday, January 19, 2017

In various articles I have discussed the historic reasons for the inclusion of the Electoral College process in presidential elections, citing specific reasons the Founding Fathers, soon after gaining American independence from the British Empire and experiencing the deficiencies of the Articles of Confederation, finally framed a Constitutional Republic at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in 1787. The founders chose this form of government for the United States rather than a simple majoritarian democracy. As opposed to a mass democracy where a simple popular majority decides the law, the rights of citizens, and the election of all officials — in a Constitutional Republic, the deliberate rule of law is supreme, and the government is limited in scope and is subject to the doctrines of Limited Government, Separation of Powers, and Checks and Balances. In a Republic, the property of all, the human rights of unpopular minorities, and the natural rights of individual citizens are all protected, despite unjust, capricious, and sometimes the covetous vote of the majority of less-well-to-do citizens.

The Electoral College is one of those institutions of a republican...



Wednesday, January 11, 2017

This is a review of the book Aristotle by John Herman Randall, Jr., Easton Press leather bound edition (1990).

The author John Herman Randall (1899-1980) was an educator, Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University, and a humanist, signer of the Humanist manifesto (1933). A favorable Foreword for the book was written by the Reverend Joseph Owens, C. Ss. R. (1908-2005), a Canadian Roman Catholic priest and philosopher, a Christian scholar of St. Thomas Aquinas, Aristotle, metaphysics, and medieval philosophy. This Foreword adds to the value of this tome.

However, the Foreword is somewhat misleading, as the good priest set out apparently to find what was good in the work, and he found enough of it to be able to write a praiseworthy introduction. True, as intimated by Father Owens, the author Randall admires and places Aristotle on the intellectual pedestal “The Philosopher”  deserves. Father Owens points out and praises Randall and “his penetrating insight to insist that Aristotelianism ‘can be applied to any social and cultural materials…to Soviet Russia, to medieval Christendom, to India, to New York City.’ ” This was apparently the type of statement...



Tuesday, January 3, 2017

As Ronald Reagan used to say, when repeatedly correcting misstatements, “here we go again!” And yes, I repeatedly hear the United States of America referred to as a democracy by both parroting ignorants as well as those who know or should know better. Just recently a letter to the editor in my local paper argued that the Electoral College (EC) is not a good system because, “in a true democracy every vote should count and the candidate who gets the most votes should win.” Attempting logic with an Aristotelian syllogism, the writer continued, “Two of the last three men elected president were runners-up in popular votes in their initial elections. This indicates either the system is flawed or that the apportionment of electors is inequitable.”

The letter writer is dead wrong: First, the Founding Fathers created for us a Constitutional Republic, not a democracy, and they, almost to a man, abhorred the idea of framing a “true [or mass] democracy” for the emerging United States. A democracy for them was the capricious and irresponsible rule of the mob. Second, it was the letter writer’s attempted syllogism that erred not the Electoral College. The EC system is neither “flawed...



Tuesday, January 3, 2017

I went to Communism as one goes to a spring of fresh water, and I left Communism as one clambers out of a poisoned river strewn with the wreckage of flooded cities and the corpses of the drowned. --- Arthur Koestler

Darkness at Noon (1940) by Arthur Koestler is worth reading and not forgetting. It is a condemnation of collectivist authoritarianism— you may call it socialism or communism. They are nuances of the same evil political philosophy,  a spectral ideology that  refuses to die. The book is both a literary masterpiece and a tour de force in intellectual historical drama; it is as eloquent, given its subject matter, it’s more intense than Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich. Both dramas are fast moving and intensely emotive. But whereas in Solzhenitsyn’s little epic we are dealing within injustice, imprisonment, useless labor, and hopelessness, in the case of Koestler’s Darkness at Noon, we are dealing with the more immediate arrest and incarceration of a former apparatchik, a former Bolshevik whose hands are not completely clean and who had participated in bringing about the state of persecution and terror in which he finds...



Tuesday, December 27, 2016

It is refreshing to see President-elect Trump on his “Thank You” tour speaking from a podium that proclaims “Merry Christmas.” The Trump victory was a revolt against Cultural Marxism, also known as political correctness. In that world, Merry Christmas is watered down into “Happy Holidays.”

In fact, says one strategic analyst, “Trump won because he got on his side a big segment of the population that has been under furious and brutal attack for more than 50 years by the political correctness of Cultural Marxism. This cultural and sociological attack from Cultural Marxists was extremely intense and conducted at full high speed for the last eight years of the Obama regime with its grand social engineering and cultural remake of the country.”

Ron Aledo, a retired U.S. Army officer and former senior analyst for the CIA and the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA), has written a provocative analysis of the U.S. election results, saying that Trump’s victory was economic but also cultural.

He says that the Trump victory was “not only an incredible miracle as he won basically against all and everything, from CNN to furious non-stop (and something ridiculous) attacks...